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How to Tell if Your Spouse Is Snooping on Your Mac

Posted by J. Benjamin Stevens | Jan 08, 2014 | 0 Comments

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I have been practicing family law in Spartanburg for well over 18 years, and I never cease to be amazed at the things spouses do to try to spy on each other, particularly when Family Court is on the horizon. This can take the form of reading emails/texts, intercepting messages from attorneys, and/or attempting to plant or manufacture evidence.

Obviously, if you are facing a separation or divorce, it is in your best interest to take all reasonable steps to make and keep your data as secure as possible. The best way to protect against someone from snooping is to password protect your Mac. You do this with login passwords for sleep, boot, and wake, and always use the lock screen when you're away from your computer.

If you suspect someone is accessing your Mac while you're away and getting into personal documents and files, there are some simple steps you can take to find out. The quickest and easiest way to find out is to look at the Recent Items list. To do this, pull down the  Apple menu, go to “Recent Items”, and look for apps, servers, and documents you didn't open.

You can make this easier by first clearing out that menu list, then leaving your Mac alone. That way, the only items showing in the Recent Items list will be those opened by the snooper. To clear that list, close out of all apps, files, and documents, pull down the  Apple menu, go to “Recent Items”, then select “Clear Menu”. You can also increase the number of items stored in Recent Items in your System Preferences.

If you are dealing with a savvy snooper, you can take additional steps to catch them, such as checking system logs, finding exact boot and wake times, and determining what caused your Mac to wake from sleep. Earlier this week, we discussed ways to determine if your spouse is snooping on your iPhone or iPad and ways to protect your iDevice. Remember, it is your responsibility to keep your data secure – and you can never be too safe.

Source: How to Easily Tell If Someone Opened Your Files on a Mac published at OS X Daily.

About the Author

J. Benjamin Stevens

Aggressive, creative, and compassionate are words Ben Stevens' colleagues freely use to describe him as a divorce and family law attorney. Ben is a Fellow in the prestigious American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, the International Academy of Family Lawyers, and is a Board Certified Family Trial Advocate by the National Board of Trial Advocates. He is one of only four attorneys in South Carolina with those simultaneous distinctions. To schedule a consultation with Ben Stevens call (864) 598-9172.

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