Close X

Blog

South Carolina Family Law Decisions from ABA Family Law Quarterly

Posted by Jonathan W. Lounsberry | Jul 01, 2015 | 0 Comments

Advance sheet 300x199

The Winter 2015 edition of the Family Law Quarterly (published by the ABA Section of Family Law) provided the annual “Family Law in the Fifty States,” a review of the state of family Law from across the United States in the following areas: adoption; agreements; alimony and maintenance; alternative dispute resolution; assisted conception; attorneys; child abuse; child custody and visitation; child support; dissolving of the marital relationship; domestic violence; marriage; names; paternity; property division; and torts.

I look forward to this edition of the Family Law Quarterly each year, as it provides insight into the trends of family in the United States allowing our firm to stay up-to-date on the decisions that may impact our clients. With that in mind, this year's edition made note of the following South Carolina family law appellate decisions:

Prenuptial Agreements

Hudson v. Hudson, 408 S.C. 76, 757 S.E.2d 727 (Ct. App. 2014): “The wife's allegations that she was under high pressure due to the impending wedding and the parties' unequal bargaining power did not render the agreement unconscionable.” See Family Law in Fifty States 2013-2014: Case Digests, Family Law Quarterly, 48 Fam. L. Q. 675, 681 (2015). You can find our briefing of the opinion here.

Alimony

Mick-Skaggs v. Skaggs, 411 S.C. 94, 766 S.E.2d 870 (Ct. App. 2014): “Although divorce was granted on basis of one year's continuous separation, husband presented sufficient corroborating testimony of wife's adultery so as to bar alimony.” See Family Law in Fifty States 2013-2014: Case Digests, Family Law Quarterly, 48 Fam. L. Q. 675, 684 (2015).You can find our briefing of the opinion here.

Dissolving the Marital Relationship

Hill v. Bell, 405 S.C. 423, 747 S.E.2d 791 (2013): “South Carolina does not recognize the Putative Spouse Doctrine when a person believes he is legally married, but is not. The trial court properly determined the second marriage was void under South Carolina's bigamy statute, and the putative second spouse id not have the rights of a legal spouse.” See Family Law in Fifty States 2013-2014: Case Digests, Family Law Quarterly, 48 Fam. L. Q. 675, 719 (2015). You can find our briefing of the opinion here.

If you require further information on anything covered above, please contact our firm to make an appointment with one of our attorneys. Further information can also be found on the Divorce/Separation and Alimony/Support pages on our website.

This publication is a general summary of law. It should in no way replace legal advice specific to your circumstances or in any way creates an attorney-client relationship.

© The Stevens Firm, P.A. 2015

About the Author

Jonathan W. Lounsberry

When it comes to your case, you need an experienced Spartanburg family law attorney on your side.

Comments

There are no comments for this post. Be the first and Add your Comment below.

Leave a Comment

Comments have been disabled.

Twitter

Subscribe to our Newsletter!

Sign 20up 202

CLICK HERE to subscribe to our new monthly newsletter full of interesting news, stories, and advice to benefit you and your family.